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Rosé has a bit of both and has become increasingly popular in recent years precisely for this reason. It is the ideal summer wine, which was originally only a by-product of red wine production. This is because rosé wine was created by utilizing the residual red grapes.
However, contrary to what is believed in many places, it is not created by mixing red and white wine. Within the EU, the so-called blending of the two is actually prohibited. Not even must from red and white grapes may be blended in the EU. One method of producing rosé is pressurage direct. This means that the grapes do not undergo maceration, but are pressed directly. However, in addition to direct pressing, there is also the saignée method. Instead of pressing the red wine grapes directly, they are stored in a maceration tank for a maximum of 24 hours. Due to their own weight, they begin to "bleed" (French: saigner). The resulting juice is drawn off and processed like a white wine. Only then are the grapes pressed. In this way, the saignée method also produces red wine at the same time.
French grapes such as Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon are particularly popular for this popular summer wine. Thanks to its lightness, the wine can be combined with many Mediterranean dishes.

The perfect summer wine
As mentioned above, rosé is particularly suitable as a refreshing drink during the hot months. What could be better than sitting on the terrace or in the garden with friends in the evening after work or on a well-deserved weekend, feeling the warm rays of the sun on your skin? It's even nicer with a glass of rosé. Whether neat or with food, the "hybrid" is an absolute all-rounder on hot days! Whether you are grilling a delicious steak, enjoying a piece of salmon fillet or looking forward to your vegetable skewer, you can drink the pink refreshing drink with almost any meal. Hearty meals like meat are perfectly complemented and highlighted by the fruity nature of rosé. At the same time, thanks to its refreshing taste, it rounds off various vegetables such as zucchini, mushrooms as well as eggplant and also goes well with summer fruits such as watermelon or strawberries. You can also enjoy a glass on an empty stomach or as a dessert and consciously engage in the fruity aroma in combination with the typical light sweetness, refined by its subtle acidity. While doing so, close your eyes and listen to the soft fizz and breathe in the aroma. You will notice how easy it is to relax with a glass of rosé.

History and production of the refreshing drink
When you think of wine, your mind immediately goes to Italy and France, lost in the vastness of vineyards. But where does rosé originally come from and when did it originate? Surprisingly, quite little is known about its origins to this day. One of the few facts is that the first variety originated in France. When it was first produced and by whom cannot be clearly determined. However, researchers agree that the "hybrid" was already known during the Middle Ages and enjoyed great popularity, especially in monasteries. Although it did not take long for the wine to become known outside of France, winemakers did not produce it in any other country until the 18th century. Only slowly did the production base expand throughout Europe. Thanks to brisk trade, rosé became known and enjoyed all over the world during the Middle Ages and the early modern period. Although in recent years it has lagged significantly behind red and white wine, it has been grown and produced for decades in many different countries around the world. Its production is a true work of art and anything but easy, which is why the EU proposed a draft law in 2009 to simplify its production. The winegrowers' associations were strictly against it, seeing the reputation of their favorite drink as well as its quality in danger, so this proposal was withdrawn again. Today, wine lovers can buy different types of rosé wine: in an exclusive rosé wine store, on the Internet or in supermarkets.

The production of rosé wine
The secret of rosé and its very special taste lies in its production. As already mentioned, in 2009 the EU occupied them with a new draft law on the production of rosé. But why did it not concern either the red wines or the white wines? What are the peculiarities of rosé wine and what was the original change to be made? The EU had the idea to produce Rosé as a blend between red and white wine and to make the work easier for the winemakers. After wine associations successfully rebelled against it, a process was developed that is still decisive today.

Three grape varieties should be used
In order for the wine to maintain its light color and unique taste, three grape varieties are used in particular: Gewürztraminer, Pinot Gris and Grenache Gris, with 30 grape varieties officially permitted in Germany alone. The grapes that serve as the basis are all red, but are processed like white varieties during the production process. First, the grapes are hand-picked and stripped of their stems before being pressed and, as with white wine, fermented directly without the skins. Although it is allowed within the EU to pick the fruit with the help of machines, this is very rarely done by winemakers, as the grapes would otherwise be damaged. This would significantly deteriorate the quality and thus reduce the value of the wine. The grapes are only on the mash for a short time, and during this time the wine loses some of its color intensity, as some of the colorant passes into the must. To prevent the rosé from becoming too dark and taking on the color of the red wine, it is processed quickly. However, there is no European regulation on how long the wine may lie on the mash. It is always at the discretion of each winemaker to decide when to draw off the must and continue processing his wine. As a result, the varieties vary in color and taste. While the grapes for white wine are removed from the mash very quickly, many winemakers leave their grapes for rosé for an average of two to three days to achieve a light pink color. The saignée method is particularly well known. In this method, after 12 to 48 hours, about 10 to 15% of the must is extracted without pressing from the fermentation tank for red wine and processed into rosé wine. With this method, the rosé is made as a byproduct of the red wine, so the winemaker's focus is actually on the red wine. However, there is also the option for experienced winemakers to make rosé from the yield of young vines. This has the advantage that these wines have a particularly fruity taste.

Apart from the saignée method, there are also the maceration and the pressing metod. By maceration is meant the beginning of the winemaking process. In this method, the must has direct contact with the grape skins for a very brief moment. This contact usually lasts only a few minutes to a maximum of a few hours, depending on the winemaker's preferences. In the case of red wine, on the other hand, the contact with the skins can last for weeks. If the winemaker wants the rosé to have a darker color and, consequently, a more intense flavor, he ensures that the contact with the skins is somewhat longer.
The pressing method, which is particularly popular in Provence, does not involve maceration. This means that the grapes are freed from their skins and the must does not get any skin contact. Instead, the winemaker presses the red grapes as the first step, which results in the wine having only a light pink color. The skins of the grapes give very little color and aroma to the must, which is then further vinified like a white wine.

Rosé sparkling wines, activated charcoal and dark rosé
If the winemaker leaves the grapes on the mash for up to three days, his wine will end up with a darker color. It is still lighter than red wine, but no longer in the popular light pink hue. Rosé sparkling wines are created when the winemaker mixes his white wine with small amounts of red wine. However, these varieties must then be labeled as sparkling wines and have a different quality. Another method of producing rosé, but not usually permitted in the EU, is to lighten the red wine with the help of activated charcoal.

Weißherbst- a special rosé
In Germany, the term Weißherbst is very common. It is a special type of rosé, which is characterized by its golden to light red color. In the production process, the must is already pressed before fermentation. For the production of Weißherbst there are special regulations in the wine law, which state, among other things, that the Rosé may only consist of one grape variety. In addition, the grapes must come from the same site and reach a certain quality level. It can be made from the Portugieser, Schwarzriesling or Pinot Noir grape varieties, although most winemakers prefer the latter. It is obligatory for every winemaker to indicate the grape variety used on the label of his wines. Not every winemaker in Germany is allowed to produce this variety. Weissherbst must come from the Ahr, Baden, Franconia, Rheingau, Rheinhessen, Palatinate or Württemberg regions to be so designated. Vin Gris, Gleichgepresster or Süßdruck denote the same rosé, but produced in Austria and France and there are different wine laws.

The typical tastes of rosé
There is no one typical flavor of rosé. Instead, it varies by variety and quality. While everyone combines the fruity nature of red wine with the freshness and lightness of white wine, each variety has different nuances that many wine connoisseurs are aware of. Those who prefer a particularly fruity and tangy taste will be happy with the German Pinot Noir and the northern Italian cuvées of Corvina and Rondinella. They are popularly known as "terrace wines" because they are drunk especially in private households during the summer season. Some rosé varieties have a more distinct structure and are characterized by a particularly fruity and acidic taste. These are more difficult to produce and those who want to buy such a rosé wine have to dig deeper into their pockets. In addition, there are also dry varieties under the rosé or even the French Tavel, which is made from white and red grapes and is known for its rather oily taste.

Climatic conditions for rosé
Rosé wines cannot be produced everywhere, as the grape varieties used depend on a warm climate. In addition, the climate in the areas may not change too much throughout the year. Although rosé is also grown in Germany and Austria, warm countries can produce fruitier varieties. In Europe, the Mediterranean regions are particularly suitable. The best known growing countries for good rosé wines are: New Zealand, Australia, Brazil, Argentina, France, Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal and the USA.

Storage of Rosé
In order for your new wine to last as long as possible, you should pay attention to proper storage. It is important that rosé is stored in a cool place. If you have the wherewithal and are generally a wine lover, a wine refrigerator with multiple cooling zones is recommended. This is because each type of wine, whether rosé, white or red, requires different temperatures to develop its full flavor. Keep your hands off corks under all circumstances, as they impair the taste. Some varieties you can store in your wine cellar.

Nine grape varieties Rosé- The right bottle for every palate.
As with any other wine, the same applies here: Not all rosé is created equal! As mentioned, there are sweet and fruity, but also dry varieties and not only the aroma, but also the color varies depending on the production process. So there is the right choice for every palate. Below we present new varieties and their flavor styles:
- Provence Rosé: Rosé produced in Provence is particularly characterized by a fresh, tangy and very fruity taste, making it suitable for almost all food groups. Most winemakers rely on a blend of Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah and Mourvèdre. They have a slightly salty finish.
- Pinot Noir: Rosé from this grape variety is very rare and therefore each bottle is special. The few varieties that exist have an earthy flavor and their aroma is reminiscent of the taste of raspberries, strawberries and red apples.
- Mourvèdre Rosé are southern French classics, characterized above all by a particularly full-bodied aroma. They have a floral aroma and taste a bit more tart than rosés made from other grape varieties. Depending on the winemaker, they may also have a slightly smoky finish.
- Grenache: Rosés from this grape variety are most notable for their acidity. Nevertheless, they have a certain balance in the overall taste and their aroma is reminiscent of strawberries, hibiscus and oranges.
- Sangiovese Rosé stands out primarily for its copper-red color and comes from Italy. Its aroma is reminiscent of fresh strawberries and melons with a slight peach and rose petal note. In addition, these wines are known for their strong acidity and slight bitterness on the finish.
- Tempranillo Rosé: This rustic Spanish wine has a light pink color and tastes mainly of strawberry. It is combined with the taste of green pepper and various herbs, making it particularly suitable for chicken dishes.
- Cabernet Rosé: Wines from this grape variety are mostly produced by the saignée method and have a ruby red color. They are characterized by a very savory aroma, leaning on green peppers, cherry juice, black currants and pepper.
- Syrah Rosé is primarily known for its very strong aroma. They have a very dark coloring and are only just considered rosés. They are especially popular with men.
- Tavel Rosé is also known as the king among rosés and is produced exclusively in the Tavel growing area. It is the only production area in the world that specializes exclusively in rosé and does not produce white wine or red wine. These wines are very powerful and known for their uncharacteristically high alcohol content and are very reminiscent of red wines. They have a slightly oily aroma and are made primarily from Grenache and Cinsault. However, a total of nine grape varieties are permitted.

Buy rosé wine in our rosé wine store
After the presentation of these nine varieties, did you now feel like drinking rosé yourself? Perhaps you were also one of those wine connoisseurs who stubbornly smiled at rosé and opted for either red wines or white wines. If so, it's never too late to broaden your horizons. After all, you have nothing to lose. Ideally, you may even find a new favorite variety. Of course, you can buy rosé at your nearest supermarket, provided the store manager has rosé in his assortment. But if you want to get a really good, possibly first, impression of the pink alcohol, we advise you to make your purchase through our Rosé Wine Shop. Before you buy a rosé wine, you should take your time to look around. We offer 23 different rosés in a price range between 4,36€ and 41,69€ per bottle. Through our extensive selection, both rosé novices and rosé lovers will enjoy. The varieties vary, depending on the country of origin and production method, in their color and aroma and range in absolute alcohol content between 9.5% and 14%. If you are still undecided about which rosé is right for you, do not hesitate to contact us. Our experienced staff will be happy to contact you and answer all your questions.

 
 
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